May 27, 2014

To the surprise of many, the far-right parties’ overwhelming success in the recent European Parliament elections has united European Muslims and Jews.

In response to such victories, notably the Front national’s, Imam Ahmed Miktar, president of the Association of the Imams of France, told Reuters, “We must learn to work together effectively on both the grass roots and leadership levels…Our communities can no longer afford the luxury of standing apart.”

His comments come in the wake of far-right victories throughout Europe, particularly Marine Le Pen’s Front national party, which garnered 25% of the total votes. The results have sparked worry among France’s religious minority groups who have since voiced the need to unite in face of the extreme parties.

Following the elections, the Gathering of European Muslim and Jewish Leaders has promised to “work closely together to fight Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and xenophobia and prevent the far right parties from realizing their goal of passing a common legislative agenda in the European parliament severely restricting the rights of religious minorities.”

The statement recognized the group’s previous successes by stating that, “Just as European Muslim and Jewish leaders joined forces in recent months in successfully combating an effort by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe to outlaw circumcision and to protest Denmark’s new law banning kosher and halal slaughtering, we will now stand together and speak with one voice against efforts by the extremist parties to implement their hateful agenda.”

The Front national’s triumphs, along with those of other far-right groups, is expected to hinder Turkey’s EU bid. France and Germany have been the leading opponents of Turkey’s entrance into the EU. If the country’s bid is successful it will be the first major Muslim country in the EU. Many believe that the Front national fears a Muslim-majority country joining the EU, as this could lead to increased immigration into France.

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